Jack Elam Net Worth: How Rich is The American film actor Actually?

In his film and television career, William Scott “Jack” Elam (November 13, 1920 – October 20, 2003) played villains in Western films, and, later in his career, comedies (sometimes outing his villainous image).

His misaligned eye stood out as his most distinguishing physical characteristic. While serving in the US Navy, he worked in finance and took several jobs before he became an actor.

 

Age, Net Worth,  Career, Nationality, Bio, Profession,

Real Name William Scoot Elam
Died Oct-20-2003
Date of Birth 13-Nov-1920
Place of Birth Miami, Arizona, US
Profession Actor
Nationality American
Height 6’1”
Net Worth $2 Million

The actor has appeared in at least 41 TV series and 73 movies. He has been seen on the series Once Upon a Time in the West, High Noon, Support Your Local Sheriff!Sheriff!Sheriff! , and on The Twilight Zone and Gunsmoke, among other series.

 

Early Life of Jack

Millard Elam and Alice Amelia Kirby were married in 1897 and had a daughter named Elam. Jack’s mother passed away in September 1924, when he was only three years old.

From 1930 to 1938, Flossie Varney Elam was living with her father, older sister Mildred, and his stepmother.

His father picked cotton as a child. In a boyhood altercation with a fellow Boy Scout, Elam was stabbed with a pencil and lost sight in his left eye.

Miami High School was in Gila County, and Phoenix Union High School was in Maricopa County. He graduated from both schools in the late 1930s and attended Santa Monica Junior College in California.

 

Professional Career

He worked at Bank of America in Los Angeles as a bookkeeper and Standard Oil Company as an auditor before becoming an actor.

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Afterward, Samuel Goldwyn became an independent accountant in Hollywood where he served as a United States Navy officer for two years during World War II. During his tenure as a manager, he also oversaw the Hotel Bel-Air in Los Angeles.

Among Elam’s earliest screen appearances is She Shoulda Said No!No!No! in which a chorus girl’s habitual marijuana use contributes to her brother’s suicide and ruins her career. Elam’s filmography was however dominated by Westerns and gangster films during this period, typically playing villains.

He appeared on numerous Western television series in the 1950s and 1960s, including Gunsmoke, Lawman, Bonanza, Cheyenne, Have Gun – Will Travel, The Lone Ranger, The Rebel, F Troop, Tales of Wells Fargo, The Texan, and Rawhide.

“Will the Real Martian Please Stand Up?” featured him as a slightly crazed bus passenger on The Twilight Zone. On the anthology series Death Valley Days in 2010, he portrayed the Mexican historical figure, Juan Cortina. “Clooney Hutter” was part of Elam’s Lawman portrayal of Paul Henry in 1962.

Deputy U.S. Marshal J.D. Smith, a reformed gunfighter, was portrayed by Elam in the ABC/Warner Bros. series The Dakotas, which was intended to succeed Cheyenne.

A total of 19 episodes were produced for The Dakotas. NBC/WB’s Temple Houston starred Jeffrey Hunter as gunslinger-turned-marshal George Taggart.

The role was given to Elam after James Coburn didn’t want it. A 26-week period was devoted to that series.

The Night of the Grizzly was directed by Clint Walker,, and starred Jack Elam and Clint Walker. During the 1968 spaghetti western Once Upon a Time in the West, Elam had a cameo role.

His character was one of three gunslingers who were hired to kill Bronson’s character in that film. In the scene, Elam spent a good deal of time trying to catch a fly in a gun barrel.

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As the lighthearted Preacher Weatherby taking part in a wagon train on the Oregon Trail in 1967’s The Way West with Robert Mitchum, Richard Widmark, and Kirk Douglas, Elam played the role.

He made his feature film debut in 1969 with Support Your Local Sheriff!Sheriff!Sheriff! The film was followed two years later by Support Your Local Gunfighter, which starred James Garner. Elam’s villainous roles decreased after he appeared in those two films, while his comic roles increased.

Burt Kennedy also directed both films, who saw Elam’s potential as a comedian and worked with him 15 times in films and television.

Between those two, he also appeared in Howard Hawks’ Rio Lobo (1970) as an old cranky coot opposite John Wayne. In 1974–1975, he starred in the comedy series, The Texas Wheelers, as Zack Wheeler, a long-lost father who returns to his family after his mother dies to raise his four children.

While he played the Frankenstein monster in the CBS sitcom Struck by Lightning in 1979, it was canceled after only three episodes (the remaining eight episodes were not aired in the U.S., though all 11 episodes were aired in the U.K.).

After appearing in Birds of a Feather Flock To Tim, him and Ernest Borgnine appeared in Hick Peterson in Home Improvement (season one, episode 20).

In the 1981 film The Cannonball Run, Elam played a doctor named Nikolas Van Helsing, an eccentric physician. After he came back three years later for the sequel to Cannonball Run, he played the same role again.

The Aurora Encounter starred Elam as Charlie in 1985. The experience led Elam to develop a lifelong friendship with Mickey Hays, a boy with progeria who was part of the production.

I Am Not a Freak, a documentary about Elam and Hays, depicts their close relationship. I’ve met many people, but I haven’t met anyone who has been like Mickey.” Elam said.

Elam was also in the 1986 comedy series Easy Street as Alvin “Bully” Stevenson, LK’s downtrodden uncle. McGuire. He starred in Where the Hell’s That Gold? with Willie Nelson in 1988. The National Cowboy and Western Heritage Museum inducted Elam into its Hall of Great Western Performers in 1994.

 

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Personal Life of Elam

In 1937 and 1961, Jack Elam was married to Jean Hodgert, and in 1961, to Margaret Jennison. Four years after losing Anne Elam in an accident, Elam had finally found love with Margaret Jennison. Congestive heart failure claimed Elam’s life in Ashland, Oregon, in 2003.

 

Biography of Jack Elam

The net worth of Jack Elam is $2 million. Miami, Arizona native Jack Elam passed away in October 2003. He was born in November 1920. His left eye was known to be lazy and he appeared in a number of Western films as a villain.

In addition to his acting career, Elam served with the United States Navy in World War II. The Dakotas starred him as Deputy J.D. Smith, who had more than 200 acting credits in his career. The TV series Temple Houston starred Elam as George Taggart from 1963 to 1964.

Throughout the 1960s and 1970s, he appeared regularly on Gunsmoke. In the television series East Street, Elam played Uncle Alvin “Bully” Stevenson.

As a film actor, he was known for Bird of Paradise, Rawhide, High Noon, Princess of the Nile, Gunfight at the OK corral, The Rare Breed, The Apple Dumpling Gang Rides Again, The Cannonball Run, and Suburban Commando, to name just a few.

In October of 2003, Jack Elam died from congestive heart failure after being 82 years old.

 

Net Worth of Elam

In his lifetime, he accumulated a net worth of $2 million.